• 19 SEP 07
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    #802: The UK’s HPA springs into ICNIRP defence following EU support for BioInitiative

    From Mast Victims.org:

    http://www.mast-victims.org/index.php?content=news&action=view&type=newsitem&id=2211

    HPA springs into ICNIRP defence following EU support for BioInitiative

    United Kingdom Created: 18 Sep 2007

    Yesterday the HPA issued a press release about a symposium held at the HPA fifth annual conference that will “consider what is an acceptable level of exposure to these radio waves without them being a risk to our health”.

    The press release (below) states that, quote: “although there are some remaining uncertainties, there is a sound scientific basis already used for restricting our exposure to them”. Apparently the HPA conference is to become a panic platform for convincing people that current ICNIRP guidelines have a “sound scientific basis” but the funny thing is that if you look at the schedule for the conference, there seems to be no mention of such a symposium at all:
    http://www.hpa-events.org.uk/hpa/frontend/dailyAgendaAlt.csp?dayNumber=1&mode=grid&eventID=28
    (page retrieved 18.09.2007 13:50)

    So apparently this “symposium” is a last-minute change following the European Union support for the BioInitiative report that calls for a rejection of
    ICNIRP guidelines. The really interesting thing is that the presenter of this sudden symposium, Dr Simon Mann from the HPA’s Centre for Radiation, also happens to be a new recruit of ICNIRP. See here:
    http://www.icnirp.de/sc3.htm

    ———————————

    HPA Press Statement

    17 September 2007

    New technology and radio waves – how much is too much?

    Our desire for new technology grows every year but new innovations can also lead to concerns about possible health effects. In the 1970s microwave ovens were linked to health concerns, in the 1980s the debate turned to VDUs, then in the 1990s concern was voiced about mobile phones and their base stations. The debate is currently focused on concerns about exposure to radio signals from wireless computer networking (WiFi).

    Satellite navigation systems, broadcast radio and television, mobile phones and WiFi all use radio signals transmitted through the air. The number of radio transmitters in the community and in homes has increased markedly over recent years.

    At the Health Protection Agency’s (HPA) fifth annual conference in Warwick a symposium will consider what is an acceptable level of exposure to these radio
    waves without them being a risk to our health? Dr Simon Mann, from the HPA’s Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards will present ‘Measuring Radiowaves in the Environment’ on the first
    day of the conference.

    Dr Mann will explain how radio waves are measured to what use the results are put. He will show the different types of equipment that can be used to measure the strength of radio signals in the environment. Typical results will be shown and a live demonstration of a spectrum analyser, used to measure
    the strength of radiowaves, will be given. Dr Mann will use the equipment to measure the signals from delegates’ mobile phones.

    Dr Mann says: “The HPA, in conjunction with expert groups, has investigated and advised people on what impact radiowaves may have on their health. Internationally, health authorities such as the World Health Organization have done the same. Extensive research has been carried out on the biological
    effects of exposure to radiowaves and, although there are some remaining uncertainties, there is a sound scientific basis already used for restricting our
    exposure to them.”

    Advice provided by the Health Protection Agency has been used to develop health-related studies.

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