Independent information on the possible health and safety issues arising from human exposure to electromagnetic energy.

Consultation Services

  • Architects and builders

    How to reduce or eliminate excessive EMF areas during the preliminary design phase.

  • Homeowners

    How to identify and eliminate excessive EMFs in the home.

  • Medical practitioners

    If you suspect EMF exposure may be a factor in your patient’s ill health (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome).

  • Wireless Technology

    Advice on how to reduce microwave exposure from mobile phones, Wi-Fi and other wireless technology.

  • Inside air quality

    Advice on chemical and mould exposure in buildings including electrical equipment VOCs.

  • Workplace OH&S

    How to identify and eliminate or reduce EMF in the workplace

From the Blog

  • The Highly Dangerous ‘Triton’ Hackers Have Probed the US Grid

    On the scale of security threats, hackers scanning poten­tial targets for vulnerabilities might seem to rank rather low. But when it’s the same hackers who previously executed one of the most reckless cyberattacks in history—one that could have easily turned destructive or even lethal—that recon­nais­sance has a more foreboding edge. Especially when the target of their scanning is the US power grid….SNIP

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  • GBM Rising in Denmark, Much as in England True Increases or Artifacts?

    From Microwave News
    Excerpt:
    New government data, released in May by a member of the Danish Parliament, show a near doubling of glioblastoma (GBM), a usually fatal brain tumor, in Denmark since the year 2000.Equally provocative: The trend is very similar to what was reported in England last year.Take a look at some graphs and decide for yourself whether these trends are worth talking about. The RF establishment would have me believe this isn’t real. I need to be convinced…SNIP

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  • Ditch the GPS. It’s ruining your brain. ( plus an article “Forget Self-Driving Cars. Bring Back the Stick Shift” )

    The following article in the Washington Post has interesting implications for the future of today’s society as we enter the world of 5G and the Internet of Things (IoT), where more and more of our thinking, and most importantly, our children’s, is done for us by our devices. How will, what has been called the Google Effect, change they way we think and our ability to think independently of our devices? A shrinking brain perhaps?… From the Washington Post By M.R. O’Connor June 5 Excerpts: M.R. O’Connor is a journalist who writes about science, technology and ethics, and is the author, most recently, of “Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World.”It has become the most natural thing to do: get in the car, type a destination into a smartphone, and let an algorithm using GPS data show the way. Personal GPS-equipped devices entered the mass market in only the past 15 or so years, but hundreds of millions of people now rarely travel without them. These gadgets are extremely powerful, allowing people to know their location at all times, to explore unknown places and to avoid getting lost.But they also affect perception and judgment. When people are told which way to turn, it relieves them of the need to create their own routes and remember them. They pay less attention to their surroundings. And neuroscientists can now see that brain behavior changes when people rely on turn-by-turn directions. In a study published in Nature Communications in 2017, researchers asked subjects to navigate a virtual simulation of London’s Soho neighborhood and monitored their brain activity, specifically the hippocampus, which is integral to spatial navigation. Those who were guided by directions showed less activity in this part of the brain than participants who navigated without the device. “The hippocampus makes an internal map of the environment and this map becomes active only when you are engaged in navigating and not using GPS,” Amir-Homayoun Javadi, one of the study’s authors, told me.The hippocampus is crucial to many aspects of daily life. It allows us to orient in space and know where we are by creating cognitive maps. It also allows us to recall events from the past, what is known as episodic memory. And, remarkably, it is the part of the brain that neuroscientists believe gives us the ability to imagine ourselves in the future.Studies have long shown the hippocampus is highly susceptible to experience. (London’s taxi drivers famously have greater gray-matter volume in the hippocampus as a consequence of memorizing the city’s labyrinthine streets.) Meanwhile, atrophy in that part of the brain is linked to devastating conditions, including post-traumatic stress disorder and Alzheimer’s disease. Stress and depression have been shown to dampen neurogenesis — the growth of new neurons — in the hippocampal circuit.What isn’t known is the effect of GPS use on hippocampal function when employed daily over long periods of time. Javadi said the conclusions he draws from recent studies is that “when people use tools such as GPS, they tend to engage less with navigation. Therefore, brain area responsible for navigation is less used, and consequently their brain areas involved in navigation tend to shrink.”.. SNIP

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  • Colorectal Cancer Soaring in Young Adults; Are Smartphones in the Mix? Epidemiologist De-Kun Li Wants To Know

    From Louis Slesin, Microwave News June 3, 2019
    Excerpt: Americans in their 20s are getting more colon and rectal cancer. Those born in 1990 now face four times the risk of developing rectal cancer and twice the risk of colon cancer, compared to those born around 1950, according to the American Cancer Society. Similar patterns are being seen in many other countries. Known risk factors for colorectal cancer include obesity, an unhealthy diet and lack of physical activity. But De-Kun Li, an epidemiologist and veteran EMF researcher, doesn’t think they explain what’s going on. Li offers a different hypothesis: Young people’s habit of carrying their cell phones in the front or back pockets of their jeans. “When placed in trouser pockets, the phones are in the vicinity of the rectum and the distal colon and these are the sites of the largest increases in cancer,” he says…SNIP

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  • Dariusz Leszczynski: ‘Brief Opinion on 5G and Health’

    From Leszczynski’s blog: between a Rock and a Hard Place, May 31, 2019
    Excerpt
    […The below presented brief opinion is not a comprehensive review of the issue but opinion pointing towards few of the important issues associated with the deployment of the 5G technology…]The currently ongoing deployment of the 5th generation of the wireless communication technology (5G) is being met with great enthusiasm by the telecommunication industry and national governments and general public. However, there is also some resistance from the part of the population in various locations around the globe. The opposition towards deployment of the 5G is caused by the uncertainty whether radiation emitted by the 5G networks and devices will have any health effects on human health and environmental impact on fauna and flora. Author of this ‘Brief Opinion’ considers the rapid deployment of the 5G technology as premature, in the context of the very limited scientific research on effects of low level exposures to sub-millimeter- and millimeter waves, as expressed e.g. in final points of conclusions of the invited lectures: (SNIP)

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