Independent information on the possible health and safety issues arising from human exposure to electromagnetic energy.

Consultation Services

  • Architects and builders

    How to reduce or eliminate excessive EMF areas during the preliminary design phase.

  • Homeowners

    How to identify and eliminate excessive EMFs in the home.

  • Medical practitioners

    If you suspect EMF exposure may be a factor in your patient’s ill health (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome).

  • Wireless Technology

    Advice on how to reduce microwave exposure from mobile phones, Wi-Fi and other wireless technology.

  • Inside air quality

    Advice on chemical and mould exposure in buildings including electrical equipment VOCs.

  • Workplace OH&S

    How to identify and eliminate or reduce EMF in the workplace

From the Blog

  • New paper on wireless radiation and diabetes

    Published in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine. Published online: 19 May 2017

    Radiation from wireless technology elevates blood glucose and body temperature in 40-year-old type 1 diabetic male
    Catherine E. Kleiber

    ABSTRACT

    A type 1 diabetic male reports multiple instances when his blood glucose was dramatically elevated by the presence of microwave radiation from wireless technology and plummeted when the radiation exposure ended. In one instance, his body temperature elevated in addition to his blood glucose. Both remained elevated for nearly 48 h after exposure with the effect gradually decreasing. SNIP…

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  • Off topic: Cancer treatment hype gives false hope to many patients

    After Michael Uvanni’s older brother, James, was diagnosed with a deadly form of skin cancer, it seemed as if everyone told the family what they wanted to hear: Have hope. You can beat this, and we are here to help.

    The brothers met with doctors at a half-dozen of the country’s best hospitals, all with impressive credentials that inspired confidence…. Patients and families are bombarded with the news that the country is winning the war against cancer. The news media hypes research results to attract readers. Drug companies promise “a chance to live longer” to boost sales. Hospitals woo paying customers with ads that appeal to patients’ fears and hopes.

    “I’m starting to hear more and more that we are better than I think we really are,” said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society. “We’re starting to believe our own bullshit.” SNIP…

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  • What’s New on the BioInitiative

    From Cindy Sage

    What’s New on the BioInitiative

    Announcing a Special Section of Child Development from © The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

    Contemporary Mobile Technology and Child and Adolescent Development, edited by Zheng Yan and Lennart Hardell, May 15, 2017

    Electromagnetic Fields, Pulsed Radiofrequency Radiation, and Epigenetics: How Wireless Technologies May Affect Childhood Development

    Cindy Sage and Ernesto Burgio

    Abstract… SNIP

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  • Changemakers Tasmania: Disconnect from your devices

    Here’s a very positive campaign from a start up group here in Tasmania. If you are concerned over the increasing dependence on devices, especially by children, check out their website.

    Changemakers: Disconnect to reconnect

    We believe in the power of being present to promote positive change. That’s why we have created Meet me Unplugged. Our grassroots campaign encourages people and organisations to disconnect from their devices and reconnect with themselves, each other, their communities and their environment.

    We use a vintage approach to disseminate our ideas, word of mouth is our channel of choice. So if you heard about us, the odds are someone you know and cares about you told you or send you an email.

    If you wish to join our campaign start by telling colleagues, friends and family when scheduling meetings: Meet me Unplugged. You wont regret it! SNIP…

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  • People don’t trust scientific research when companies are involved

    From The Conversation

    May 8, 2017

    Excerpt

    A soda company sponsoring nutrition research. An oil conglomerate helping fund a climate-related research meeting. Does the public care who’s paying for science?

    In a word, yes. When industry funds science, credibility suffers. And this does not bode well for the types of public-private research partnerships that appear to be becoming more prevalent as government funding for research and development lags.

    The recurring topic of conflict of interest has made headlines in recent weeks. The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine has revised its conflict of interest guidelines following questions about whether members of a recent expert panel on GMOs had industry ties or other financial conflicts that were not disclosed in the panel’s final report.

    Our own recent research speaks to how hard it may be for the public to see research as useful when produced with an industry partner, even when that company is just one of several collaborators. SNIP

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