Independent information on the possible health and safety issues arising from human exposure to electromagnetic energy.

Consultation Services

  • Architects and builders

    How to reduce or eliminate excessive EMF areas during the preliminary design phase.

  • Homeowners

    How to identify and eliminate excessive EMFs in the home.

  • Medical practitioners

    If you suspect EMF exposure may be a factor in your patient’s ill health (Chronic Fatigue Syndrome).

  • Wireless Technology

    Advice on how to reduce microwave exposure from mobile phones, Wi-Fi and other wireless technology.

  • Inside air quality

    Advice on chemical and mould exposure in buildings including electrical equipment VOCs.

  • Workplace OH&S

    How to identify and eliminate or reduce EMF in the workplace

From the Blog

  • What’s New on the BioInitiative

    From Cindy Sage

    What’s New on the BioInitiative

    Announcing a Special Section of Child Development from © The Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

    Contemporary Mobile Technology and Child and Adolescent Development, edited by Zheng Yan and Lennart Hardell, May 15, 2017

    Electromagnetic Fields, Pulsed Radiofrequency Radiation, and Epigenetics: How Wireless Technologies May Affect Childhood Development

    Cindy Sage and Ernesto Burgio

    Abstract… SNIP

    Read more →
  • Changemakers Tasmania: Disconnect from your devices

    Here’s a very positive campaign from a start up group here in Tasmania. If you are concerned over the increasing dependence on devices, especially by children, check out their website.

    Changemakers: Disconnect to reconnect

    We believe in the power of being present to promote positive change. That’s why we have created Meet me Unplugged. Our grassroots campaign encourages people and organisations to disconnect from their devices and reconnect with themselves, each other, their communities and their environment.

    We use a vintage approach to disseminate our ideas, word of mouth is our channel of choice. So if you heard about us, the odds are someone you know and cares about you told you or send you an email.

    If you wish to join our campaign start by telling colleagues, friends and family when scheduling meetings: Meet me Unplugged. You wont regret it! SNIP…

    Read more →
  • People don’t trust scientific research when companies are involved

    From The Conversation

    May 8, 2017

    Excerpt

    A soda company sponsoring nutrition research. An oil conglomerate helping fund a climate-related research meeting. Does the public care who’s paying for science?

    In a word, yes. When industry funds science, credibility suffers. And this does not bode well for the types of public-private research partnerships that appear to be becoming more prevalent as government funding for research and development lags.

    The recurring topic of conflict of interest has made headlines in recent weeks. The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine has revised its conflict of interest guidelines following questions about whether members of a recent expert panel on GMOs had industry ties or other financial conflicts that were not disclosed in the panel’s final report.

    Our own recent research speaks to how hard it may be for the public to see research as useful when produced with an industry partner, even when that company is just one of several collaborators. SNIP

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  • Study Finds Link Between Brain Damage and Religious Fundamentalism

    Excerpt

    From Alternet via Bia Winter

    Excerpt

    A new study published in the journal Neuropsychologia has shown that religious fundamentalism is, in part, the result of a functional impairment in a brain region known as the prefrontal cortex. The findings suggest that damage to particular areas of the prefrontal cortex indirectly promotes religious fundamentalism by diminishing cognitive flexibility and openness—a psychology term that describes a personality trait which involves dimensions like curiosity, creativity, and open-mindedness.

    Religious beliefs can be thought of as socially transmitted mental representations that consist of supernatural events and entities assumed to be real. Religious beliefs differ from empirical beliefs, which are based on how the world appears to be and are updated as new evidence accumulates or when new theories with better predictive power emerge. On the other hand, religious beliefs are not usually updated in response to new evidence or scientific explanations, and are therefore strongly associated with conservatism. SNIP

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  • Aristotle, Mattel’s “digital nanny” for babies and young children.

    Excerpt from “The Story of Stuff” Project

    In July 2017, the loving guidance of a parent or caretaker has new competition from Aristotle, a “digital nanny” by toy-maker Mattel. The internet-connected device, which includes a microphone and camera, is designed to live in a child’s bedroom from birth and be a constant companion as she grows up. Mattel boasts Aristotle can “soothe” crying baby, help toddlers learn to speak, and facilitate learning in older children.

    What is the impact on a child’s development when you replace a caregiver with a robot? …SNIP

    Read more →