Row over Cancer, Cell Phone Review A Request That It Be Withdrawn (Microwave News)

Excerpt
Last month, a major review of cell phone cancer risks appeared in the Annual Review of Public Health. The authors would have us believe that cell phones do not present a cancer risk. In the course of digging into the text and supporting documents, I came across some striking contradictions, as well as some serious omissions. They give me pause about the paper’s conclusions and the motives at work. I believe that a major objective of the review is to cast doubt on IARC’s classification of RF as a possible human carcinogen, and by extension empower the WHO and ICNIRP to sidestep precaution.

Please read:
The Precarious Case Against Precaution, my detailed look at one of the central arguments used to dismiss precaution: If there were a cancer link, we would be seeing an increase in the number of brain tumors reported to national cancer registries. As I was finishing this article, I received some e-mail traffic that raises questions about the peer review process that the paper went through —or more correctly, about the lack of a conventional peer review.

My companion piece:
Row over Cancer, Cell Phone Review
Louis Slesin, PhD
Editor, Microwave News