• 17 FEB 17

    Monash University study shows how close we like to keep our mobile phones (and Rodney Croft’s dismissive spin)

    Don’s comment:

    The the Herald Sun article below we see how “spin” can be used to discount the findings of a study. Ignoring the IARC findings and a host of other research. Rodney Croft gets the final say in the article with the disingenuous statement: “there was no scientific evidence showing a link between mobile phone use and cancers”.

    From the Herald Sun by Lucie van den Berg,
    February 16, 2017 12:00am

    Excerpt:

    MOBILE phones are our constant companions, but new research reveals how close we actually like to keep our prized possessions. The Monash University study into the storage habits of young women found 15 per cent of woman had even carried their smartphone tucked into their bra or sport’s top.In an online questionnaire, almost 200 Melbourne women aged 15-40 were asked about where they carried their phone and their perception of potential health risks…

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    • 02 FEB 17

    The incidence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most virulent and deadly type of brain cancer, is going up in the U.K.

    From Louis Slesin, Microwave News

    Changing Mix of Brain Tumors in U.K.
    GBM Going Up, Other Malignant Glioma Going Down

    The incidence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most virulent and deadly type of brain cancer, is going up in the U.K., while the incidence of other types of malignant brain tumors are declining, according to some newly published raw data.

    Take a look at the data plots in our latest post and then see if you still think brain tumor rates are steady and not changing, as many public health officials and the mainstream media would have us believe. SNIP

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    • 02 FEB 17

    The Terrorist in Your Toaster: The Next Generation of IoT Hacking

    When I was five, my parents got me a robot. Connected to a wired controller, I could move it back and forth, raise its arms, flash lights and plenty of other awesome things that would spark any child’s imagination. I loved that robot even though it sucked in a few different ways.

    It made me want to improve it and I would dream of ways it could be better, like having it talk to other robots and machines (I was a tad too young for The Terminator at this point) or making it do things for me. Thanks to the internet and the advancement of robotics, my boyhood dreams are coming true.

    We are at the dawn of this era and the Internet of Things (IoT) explosion is the foundation for this advancement. Sadly, though, we must take the good with the bad. As we make our lives more convenient with IoT devices, we must also take notice of the increasing cybersecurity threats and issues accompanying this evolution. SNIP

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    • 30 JAN 17

    Scientific misconduct, censorship and the Interphone study

    From Dariusz Leszczynski’s blog, Between a Rock and A hard Place.

    Excerpt

    Uncensored version of blog post on Interphone, first published in 2011 and re-published for the first time now…

    Posted on January 30, 2017

    Below is the uncensored version of my science blog published in 2011. This version was subsequently censored by, then, STUK Director General who called me personally and informed that if I do not agree to rewrite the blog post he will need to consider if I am suited to continue work at STUK. Under this threat I agreed and STUK Director General personally revised my blog post. The link to censored version of the post and to two other posts on this subject can be found in my yesterday’s blog post. The uncensored version of the blog, published in 2011 and re-published for the first time since, gives a better idea of what happened to science and what form of scientific misconduct Interphone committed…SNIP

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    • 29 JAN 17

    Threats to Mobile Devices and the IoT Will Grow in 2017

    Cyberattacks on the Internet of Things Are Forthcoming. Intel predicts the IoT will reach 1.8 billion devices by 2019 and furthermore believes security threats to these devices will be growing quickly.
    University researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Cornell University and Stanford University are already using IoT for research. “Our first best practice is to make sure we aren’t putting IoT devices into our environment with their default passwords,” says Pitt. “Hackers can easily take advantage of those vulnerabilities.” SNIP

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    • 27 JAN 17

    And from the Dark Side: Report and conference from the IoT industry sector: Regulating the Internet of Things

    From The Internet of Things World:

    Many countries are beginning to develop their regulatory framework in relation to IoT with 2016 seeing notable progress in the UK and Singapore in particular. Issues in relation to roaming, data protection, privacy and network security have been identified and broadly agreed upon by regulators across the world.

    But what happens next? SNIP…..

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    • 27 JAN 17

    U.S. Congress moves to eliminate regulations that inhibit the roll-out of IoT technology

    The “Mobile Now Act” and “The DIGIT Act” have passed out of the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee and are headed to the full senate for a vote. They will probably be heard in the next week or two.

    Bill Info: These bills lay the foundation for the Internet of Things that will require a small cell tower transmitter every couple of homes emitting high frequency 24Ghz to 90Ghz which has never been tested for non-thermal biological effects [It is illegal in the land of democracy to oppose wireless technology for health or environmental reasons]. These transmitters will be put in public right of ways with NO ability to consider health and safety. The transmitters will be ugly, decrease property values, and expose occupants to potentially harmful microwave radiation so that your home appliances can communicate with one another which does not seem like a necessity and your privacy can be violated even more easily.

    S19
    Mobile Now Act (a) Short Title.—This Act may be cited as the “Making Opportunities for Broadband Investment and Limiting Excessive and Needless Obstacles to Wireless Act” or the “MOBILE NOW Act”.

    S88 the DIGIT Bill “To ensure appropriate spectrum planning and interagency coordination to support the Internet of Things.” SNIP

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    • 26 JAN 17

    The Internet of Things (IoT) vulnerability to malware hackers

    As Australia rapidly rolls out the smart electricity grid with smart meters for every household as an essential part of the $17 trillion Internet of Things (IoT)technological ‘revolution’, little heed is given for the grid/meters vulnerability to hackers. Already there have been reports of household wi-fi enabled appliances being hacked and there are concerns over the vulnerability of smart meters to being hacked.

    A Brave New World or Hackers Heaven? Read on.

    Excerpt

    “The [Mirai] malware… spreads to vulnerable devices by continuously scanning the Internet for IoT systems protected by factory default or hard-coded usernames and passwords,” explained KrebsonSecurity. “The insecure IoT devices are then loaded with malicious software, transforming them into “bots” and forcing them to report to a central control server, which is utilized to launch massive DDoS attacks in an effort to knock websites offline.”

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    • 22 JAN 17

    LG threatens to put Wi-Fi in every appliance it introduces in 2017

    From ARS Technica

    Its new fridge includes Amazon’s Alexa and a bunch of cameras.

    Andrew Cunningham – 1/5/2017, 6:20 AM

    Excerpt

    In the past few years, products at CES have increasingly focused on putting the Internet in everything, no matter how “dumb” the device in question is by nature. It’s how we’ve ended up with stuff like this smart hairbrush, this smart air freshener, these smart ceiling fans, or this $100 pet food bowl that can order things from Amazon.

    Now that phenomenon is reaching its logical endpoint: during the company’s CES press conference today, LG marketing VP David VanderWaal says that “starting this year” all of LG’s home appliances will feature “advanced Wi-Fi connectivity.” One of the flagship appliances that will make good on this promise is the Smart Instaview Refrigerator, a webOS-powered Internet-connected fridge that among other things supports integration with Amazon’s Alexa service. SNIP……

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    • 22 JAN 17

    Brain tumors are increasing in Denmark.

    From Mona Nilsson

    Brain tumors are increasing in Denmark.

    News release from Swedish Radiation Protection Foundation, January 20, 2017

    Never before have so many new patients been diagnosed with a brain tumor in Denmark as in year 2015. The number of people diagnosed with tumors of the central nervous system (CNS, including brain tumors) in Denmark has more than doubled since 1990 according to new statistics and the largest increase has been in the last 10 years until 2015. Among young people aged 0-39 years, tumors in the CNS are the type of cancer that has increased the most.

    According to the latest statistics from the Danish Cancer Registry that include new cancer cases diagnosed in 2015, an increasing number of people in Denmark are diagnosed with tumors of the central nervous system, CNS, including the brain, in recent years. The number of patients diagnosed per year with CNS tumors increased from the 827 in 1990 to 1807 in 2015…..SNIP

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    • 19 JAN 17

    Susan Foster on Conflict of Interest in the Berkeley’s “right to know”

    From the blog of Dariusz Leszczynski, Between a Rock and A Hard Place

    Excerpt

    This is the next in a series of the Guest Blogs on BRHP. The opinions expressed in it are of Susan Foster herself (photo). Publication of these opinions in BRHP does not imply that BRHP automatically agrees with or endorses these opinions. Publication of this, and other Guest Blogs, is an attempt to start an open debate and free exchange of opinions on RF and health.

    WILL A JUDGE’S FAILURE TO RECUSE

    SILENCE BERKELEY’S “RIGHT TO KNOW”?

    The long battle over cell phone consumer labels, with a hidden twist of legal super heroes and questions about a Ninth Circuit Court judge’s failure to recuse herself.

    A battle over free speech in Berkeley, California has pitted the city of Berkeley against the mighty telecommunications trade group, CTIA – The Wireless Association. Berkeley stands on the First Amendment argument they have a right to inform consumers of certain precautions the FCC already requires in the back of cell phone user’s manuals. SNIP

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    • 17 JAN 17

    The link between highly-polluted air and the risk of developing dementia

    Recommended article: Why Clean Air Is Important for Your Health

    Scientists believe there may be a link between highly-polluted air, and the risk of developing dementia. It has been found that people with dementia have high levels of magnetite in their brains, though it is not clear whether or not these elevated levels are related to dementia.

    If you’re concerned about the air quality in your home or community, there are some steps you can take to clean it up. First, you’ll want to assess whether your local area has polluted air or not. In some cases, you can actually see the smog over a city. A tight-fitting mask that filters pollutants would do the trick here. At home, you’ll need to use your HVAC, and a portable air purifier is also recommended.

    Take a look at this guide and discover more about the connection between dementia and dirty air, and learn how to clean the air around you. SNIP

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    • 14 JAN 17

    Smart Meters and the Internet of Things (IoT)

    Here is a very interesting posting on the Smart Grid Awareness web site. Recommended!

    We’re Being “Hunted” by Smart Meters and the Internet of Things
    Posted on January 13, 2017 by SkyVision Solutions

    Excerpt

    In an age when people’s lives are constantly tracked, recorded, analyzed, and shared by private parties, the doctrine holding that “information knowingly exposed to private parties is unprotected by the Fourth Amendment,” now threatens to swallow whole the privacy guaranteed by the Fourth Amendment.

    The “Internet of Things” refers to the prospect that nearly everything that can be connected to the Internet will be in the near future. According to one study, by the year 2020, more than 30 billion devices could be wirelessly connected to the Internet. Everything from televisions to refrigerators to electricity meters will be capable of recording data and transferring that data to third parties, with or without a user’s knowledge or consent. SNIP

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    • 13 JAN 17

    Krakow’s bold step to curb electromagnetic pollution reflects growing evidence of harm

    From the Ecologist

    Krakow’s bold step to curb electromagnetic pollution reflects growing evidence of harm
    Lynne Wycherley
    12th January 2017

    Excerpt

    As Kraków, Poland’s second city, takes steps to protect its citizens from rising electromagnetic ‘smog’ from mobile phones, wifi, Bluetooth, smart meters and other devices, Lynne Wycherley summarises 2016’s news highlights on the emerging bio-risks of rising exposure to non-ionisiong radiation. For how much longer can governments continue to ignore the growing evidence of harm?

    The first mayor of Kraków to be elected by popular ballot, law professor Jacek Majchrowski is tackling an environmental issue most governors avoid: the electromagnetic pollution in his city.

    Following work on air pollution, and in response to growing demand, he is initiating forums for citizens to discuss the growing ‘smog’ of electro-magnetic fields (EMFs).

    In a world first he is also initiating the provision of meters to detect radio-frequency (RF) / extremely low frequency (ELF) EMFs so people can collect objective data on their exposure….
    SNIP

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    • 11 JAN 17

    Health Policy Groups Question FCC’s Allowing Manufacturer Violation of Its Cell Phone Microwave Radiation Exposure Limit

    Majority of cell phones on market may exceed FCC’s stated RF safety limit of 1.6 W/kg, experts warn

    http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170110005479/en/Health-Policy-Groups-Question-FCC%E2%80%99s-Allowing-Manufacturer

    Attached is an inquiry letter sent by attorneys Swankin & Turner to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on behalf of the National Institute for Science, Law & Public Policy and Environmental Health Trust questioning the adequacy of the FCC’s enforcement of its existing cell phone radiation limits.
    The letter suggests as many as 75% of cell phones on the market today may possibly exceed the FCC’s exposure limit.
    Examples of how cell phone commonly exceed the safety limit were provided in Exhibit A to the letter.
    The Swankin & Turner inquiry letter to the FCC raised other equally important issues regarding FCC oversight of cell phones and wireless transmitting devices, including how the FCC considers its current safety limit to protect children given the psSAR assessment methodology the FCC uses was never intended to protect children….. SNIP

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    • 10 JAN 17

    Paolo Boffetta, Italian Epidemiologist, Distorts Power Line Risks

    From Louis Slesin, Microwave News

    Excerpt:

    Facts don’t seem to mean much anymore. We live in a “post-truth” time. As 2017 opened for business, a stark example of the new reality came to our attention courtesy of Paolo Boffetta, an Italian epidemiologist now at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

    In an interview with Fox News, Boffetta said that the link between power lines and childhood leukemia had been debunked. In response to a question as to whether it was safe for a pregnant woman to live next to “huge power lines,” Boffetta advised that there was no reason for concern.

    Boffetta has lost his truth compass…..SNIP

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    • 06 JAN 17

    When smart meters get hacked

    From Nick Hunn’s blog Creative Connectivity

    June 8th, 2014 | Published in Smart Energy |

    There‘s a lot of talk about grid security and data privacy in the energy industry, but very little about the consequences of what happens if smart meters go wrong. By going wrong, I don‘t just mean people attempting to hack their meters to reduce their bills.That will probably happen.I‘m more interested in the nightmare scenario when several million electricity meters suddenly disconnect……In other words, it could happen. It doesn’t need to happen now. Once they’re deployed, utilities aim to update the programs in these meters as new functionality is developed or bugs fixed. So at any point in their lives, new malicious code could be inserted…. SNIP

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    • 02 JAN 17

    The smart grid, smart meters, and the risk of cyber attacks

    As Australia hurriedly legislates to make the smart grid an essential part of the nation’s energy future, promoted by a large number of corporate vested interests, little or no concern is being given to a number of risks inherent in what is essentially a new and inadequately tested technology. I have primarily been writing about the health risks which, to date, absolutely no research has been done to quantify that risk. Although it has been claimed that no research is necessary because the exposure levels from smart meters are far below the standard limits, in reality it is because this type of research is seen as a “Pandora’s Box” for a rapid global roll-out of the technology.

    However, all that aside, another emerging risk not yet adequately addressed is the overall smart grid’s exposure to cyber attacks through cloud data storage and smart meters, as the following report examines.

    Abstract
    Cities around the world are becoming increasingly smart, which creates huge attack surfaces for potential cyber attacks. In this paper, IOActive Labs CTO Cesar Cerrudo provides an overview of current cyber security problems affecting cities as well real threats and possible cyber attacks that could have a huge impact on cities. Cities must take defensive steps now, and Cesar offers recommendations to help them get started.

    Excerpt
    Smart Grid Energy is the life line of a city; without energy there is no smart city. Last year, researchers Alberto Garcia Illera and Javier Vazquez Vidal at Black Hat Europe demonstrated it was possible to black out big city areas by manipulating smart meters exploiting encryption problems in Power-line Communication (PLC) technologies.

    This is not new; years ago Mike Davis of IOActive created the first proof-of-concept worm for the smart grid. Attacks on a smart grid could be devastating, causing millions of dollars in losses and even loss of life. SNIP

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    • 01 JAN 17

    And the Washington Post issues an update…

    “We specifically have been looking for signatures that match those reported last week by DHS and the FBI related to Russian actors,” Connecticut governor’s office spokesman Chris Collibee said. “We have not detected any activity matching the reported malware at this time.”

    In New York, a spokesman said Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo directed all state agencies to re-examine their computer systems for any security breaches. Nothing had been found.

    An attack on a U.S. power grid has long been a nightmare scenario for top U.S. officials. The National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command chief Adm. Michael Rogers have previously warned it’s not a matter of if but when attackers will also target U.S. power systems.” SNIP

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    • 01 JAN 17

    Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid

    I have been a subscriber to the Washington Post for some time and have generally found it to be an excellent source of information on what is happening in the world. However it seems even the WP is not immune to false news stories (my last posting – to be deleted shortly). The following was sent in by Swedish investigative journalist Mona Nilsson…..The Post’s story also predictably and very rapidly infected other large media outlets. Reuters thus told its readers around the world: “A malware code associated with Russian hackers has reportedly been detected within the system of a Vermont electric utility.”….

    Excerpt:

    The Washington Post on Friday reported a genuinely alarming event: Russian hackers have penetrated the U.S. power system through an electrical grid in Vermont. The Post headline conveyed the seriousness of the threat:

    The first sentence of the article directly linked this cyberattack to alleged Russian hacking of the email accounts of the DNC and John Podesta — what is now routinely referred to as “Russian hacking of our election” — by referencing the code name revealed on Wednesday by the Obama administration when it announced sanctions on Russian officials: “A code associated with the Russian hacking operation dubbed Grizzly Steppe by the Obama administration has been detected within the system of a Vermont utility, according to U.S. officials.”…. The article went on and on in that vein, with all the standard tactics used by the U.S. media for such stories: quoting anonymous national security officials, reviewing past acts of Russian treachery, and drawing the scariest possible conclusions (“‘The question remains: Are they in other systems and what was the intent?’ a U.S. official said”)….. What’s the problem here? It did not happen…. SNIP

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