Health issues related to electromagnetic radiation exposure and chemical exposure

Author Archives: EMFacts

The WHO’s EHC for RF and the EC on endocrine-disrupting chemicals: will industry win the day?

Dariusz Leszczynski reports in his blog Between a Rock and A Hard Place the current status of the WHO’s next Environmental Health Criteria (EHC) for telecommunications frequencies (RF/MW). This criteria, once written and ratified, will form the basis for RF/MW regulations for years to come – so for the Telco industry a lot is riding on the outcome. I recommend a read of Leszczynski’s WHO analysis then consider the scandal unfolding with the European Commissions criteria for identifying and regulating endocrine-disrupting chemicals – a huge concern for the chemical industry.

Will industry influence rule the day for both?
Read on….

Anti-Choice Groups Use Smartphone Surveillance to Target ‘Abortion-Minded Women’ During Clinic Visits

May 25, 2016, 6:52pm
Sharona Coutts

Women who have visited almost any abortion clinic in the United States have seen anti-choice protesters outside, wielding placards and chanting abuse. A Boston advertiser’s technology, when deployed by anti-choice groups, allows those groups to send propaganda directly to a woman’s phone while she is in a clinic waiting room.

Excerpts:

Last year, an enterprising advertising executive based in Boston, Massachusetts, had an idea: Instead of using his sophisticated mobile surveillance techniques to figure out which consumers might be interested in buying shoes, cars, or any of the other products typically advertised online, what if he used the same technology to figure out which women were potentially contemplating abortion, and send them ads on behalf of anti-choice organizations? SNIP Flynn’s targeting of women seeking abortion presents a serious threat to the privacy and safety of women exercising their right to choose, as well as to abortion providers and their staff, a Rewire investigation has found. But due to weak and patchwork laws governing privacy and data collection in the United States, the conduct appears to be perfectly legal. SNIP

Technology is making us blind: The dangerous complacency of the iPhone era

Following is an oldie (2014) but goodie from Salon.com which is quite relevant to recent postings on “A Brave New World”.
Don

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The rise of smartphones and social media has ushered in a new age of techno-optimism. And that’s a big problem
Charles Howarth
Nov 30, 2014

Excerpt

The technology pages of news media can make for scary reading these days. From new evidence of government surveillance to the personal data collection capabilities of new devices, to the latest leaks of personal information, we hear almost daily of new threats to personal privacy. It’s difficult to overstate the implications of this: The separation of the private and public that’s the cornerstone of liberal thought, not to mention the American Constitution, is being rapidly eroded, with potentially profound consequences for our freedom.

As much as we may register a certain level of dismay at this, in practice, our reaction is often indifference. How many of us have taken to the streets in protest, started a petition, canvassed a politician, or even changed our relationship with our smartphone, tablet or smartwatch? The question is why are we so unconcerned?

We could say that it’s simply a matter of habit, that we have become so used to using devices in such a way that we cannot imagine using them any differently. Or we could, for example, invoke a tragic fate in which we simply have no option but to accept the erosion of our privacy because of our powerlessness against corporations and governments.

These are, however, retrospective justifications that miss the kernel of the truth. To reach this kernel, we have to excavate the substratum of culture to uncover the ideas that shape our relationship with technology. Only here can we see that the cause is a profound ideological shift in this relationship.
READ ON….

Elon Musk’s Brave New World: Become cyborgs or risk humans being turned into robots’ pets

Elon Musk envisions a future “Brave New World” where, in order to keep up with advances in artificial intelligence (AI) technology, future humans (those who can afford it that is) will have to have a “neural lace”, embedded within their brains, becoming cyborgs, or super humans, in order to keep pace with the technology. An interesting concept worthy of the best of SiFi writers but consider that such technology would not come cheap. No coverage through medical insurance, ensuring that only the elites of the world will be able to afford having a neural lace implanted within their brains.

Essentially what Musk is envisioning is an Olympian super race – part human/part AI, essentially populated by only those who can afford it – the 1 % of the world’s population who now owns half the world’s wealth. As for all those who cannot afford joining the lofty Olympians with all their neural lace emplants, what future for them? A high-tech serfdom perhaps?
Read on…,

The Pentagon’s Mad Scientists Are Working on Mind Control

The Pentagon’s Mad Scientists Are Working on Mind Control
Let’s go inside DARPA’s secretive world

by MATTHEW GAULT

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has an incredible reputation for a group of super-scientists who create potentially world-ending weapons and technology.

The Pentagon’s mad scientists helped create the Internet, GPS and stealth fighters. Now they’re working on self driving cars, artificial intelligence and brain-computer interfaces. If you’ve read about in a science-fiction novel, there’s a good chance DARPA it trying to do it.

The powerful military organization operates behind a wall of secrecy and often the gulf between what it says it’s working on and what it’s actually working on is enormous. Today on War College, we sit down with author and journalist Annie Jacobsen to talk about her Pulitzer Prize-nominated book The Pentagon’s Brain.

Jacobsen spent years researching DARPA, interviewing its scientists and digging through its histories. Not an easy task for an organization so intent on staying private. What she discovered is both exciting … and terrifying. SNIP