Health issues related to electromagnetic radiation exposure and chemical exposure

Beware! Your new smart TV may soon be watching you!

Soon to be a thing of the past are those pleasant hot summer evenings sitting in front of your TV dressed only in your undies (or less) sipping a nice ice cold beer or iced coffee. Would you dare do so with a new smart TV where something (or someone) is able to watch you back? Better be well dressed, behave nicely and especially be careful of what you say or perhaps the thought police may late one night be knocking at your door!

I call it industry social engineering, the National Socialists also tried to create a perfect world.

Don

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Sent in by Olle Johansson

Are consumers ready for television watching back ?

http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/hometech/are-consumers-ready-for-television-watching-back-20130110-2chm4.html

In the new world of technology, television is not just for watching. It is also watching you. So-called smart TVs being unveiled this week at the Consumer Electronics Show offer technologies that watch the viewer, in an effort to offer more relevant programming.

The idea may sound eerie to those familiar with George Orwell’s novel 1984, but people in the industry say this is the next step in the evolution of TV viewing.

Chinese manufacturer TCL unveiled a new TV and set-top box to be sold later this year in the US using the Google TV platform, which recognises who is watching in order to suggest potential programs.

The new TV developed with Marvell Technology Group uses sensors and voice recognition to determine who is viewing and can offer streamed or live programs which appear to appeal to an individual or family.

“We have developed many innovations to personalise the viewing experience,” said Haohong Wang, general manager in the US for TCL, a major global manufacturer which has made TVs under the RCA and Thomson brands.

SNIP

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/hometech/are-consumers-ready-for-television-watching-back-20130110-2chm4.html#ixzz2HZ5bQKp6

Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/hometech/are-consumers-ready-for-television-watching-back-20130110-2chm4.html#ixzz2HZ1Qk58P

2 Comments

  1. leenah quan yin
    Posted January 10, 2013 at 9:33 pm | Permalink

    this spy device in smart tv’s and many other appliances to come, including smart meters, should be bought to the attention of the whole wider community! is full disclosure explained in writing for anyone looking to buy one? i doubt it! this evil little scheme is just another step towards total control of the masses. totalatarianism by big brother or the illuminati!
    this is another total violation of our rights to privacy and human rights! it is a crime against the peoples and should be bought before the courts and banned! these corrupt controllers should be jailed. but we the people need to stand up strong in masses against these crimes and reject them all in their entirety with the help of consumer laws and any professional people’s in a position of law and integrity to represent us. we will unite – we will fight! cheers to everyone on this site. stay united. thank u.

  2. George Papadopoulos
    Posted January 10, 2013 at 11:01 pm | Permalink

    “TV makers are not interested in tracking people” says the SMH article.

    I think there is a lot about the truth to the matter. Perhaps TV makers would make more money selling this data to those who do wish to track the purchaser of this technology, or may be forced by legislation to keep it archived and release it to police or government departments whenever requested.

    The “smart” thing about modern political thinking is the tacit outsourcing of surveillance to the initiative of corporations: to make it appear like an unstopable force: things like Google cameras, satellite images and ISP providers can who keep track of computer ID vs website visits and email records. Governments never mandated them, but governments do make “good” use of them.

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